Back to All Events

TOUR: Los Angeles Studio Tours


EASTSIDE TOUR: JUNE 18TH 12-4PM

BALL NOGUES STUDIOBenjamin Ball & Gaston Nogues
Ball-Nogues Studio is an integrated design and fabrication practice operating in the territory between architecture, art, and industrial design. Essential to each project is the “design” of the production process itself. We devise proprietary systems of construction, create new fabrication devices, develop custom digital tools, and invent materials with the aim of expanding the potential of the physically constructed world.

DIDIER HESSJenna Didier & Oliver Hess
A collaborative art practice that explores public experience, the built environment and the infrastructures we create to tie those forces together. We believe that each city is a living thing – a natural system – that has a pulse of its own. Through our art, we strive to connect a community to the network of relationships that sustains it by making that pulse visible.

OYLER WU COLLABORATIVEDwayne Oyler & Jenny Wu
Recognized for their experimentation in design and fabrication, the current work of OYLER WU includes installations in Los Angeles and Taipei, a mixed use development in Suzhou, China, and residences in Boston and Inner Mongolia. OYLER WU has exhibited at the Beijing Biennale, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, and the London Festival of Architecture and have published their first book, Pendulum Plane in 2009.

P-A-T-T-E-R-N-SMarcelo Spina & Georgina Huljich
P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S work can be described as an attempt to deal with architectural organizations capable of acquiring a rather unseen degree of material performance. Their work has gained worldwide recognition for its inventive approach to design and architecture that fuses advanced computation with an extended understanding of form, building systems, tectonics and materials.

PORTABLE STUDIOEdith Abeyta
Edith Abeyta is an installation artist residing in Los Angeles, California. Using re-purposed, salvaged and scavenged materials and incorporating interactive and participatory elements her installations focus and explore issues of collectivity, opportunity, and labor. Embracing notions of ephemerality and multiplicity she offers alternatives to static, single voiced art production.

URBAN OPERATIONSJohn Southern
Urban Operations is a Los Angeles design and research firm founded by architect John Southern. The office specializes in residential design as well as creative projects that seek to expand critical discourse within architecture and the arts. The diverse portfolio of work completed since the studio opened in 2005 explores a wide variety of themes within contemporary culture ranging from research pamphlets, CNC-fabrication, temporary art installations, and permanent landscape interventions.

End up your tour on Atwater Village at the LA Design Festival’s mini symposium on art and placemaking!

 

WESTSIDE TOUR: JUNE 19TH 12-5PM

CLIFF GARTEN STUDIOCliff Garten
Led by internationally celebrated sculptor Cliff Garten, Cliff Garten Studio is a multidisciplinary studio specializing in large-scale urban design and landscape sculpture. Adept at working with a diversity of materials, methods, and scales, Garten creates sculptures that explore the interplay of light, urban space, landscape, and infrastructure. The studio also pursues a range of sculptural forms, including large-scale installation and small-scale, figurative sculpture, in addition to works on paper.

LAYERLisa Little & Emily White
Layer is an architecture firm formed by partners Lisa Little and Emily White in 2009. Layer’s approach to design is rooted in rigorous material experimentation and a sensitivity to the nuances of human perception. Our projects range from buildings to installations, and have appeared at museums and galleries including Materials & Applications, the Pasadena Museum of Art and the A+D Museum. Currently we are working on an installation for the Skirball Cultural Center and a house in Venice.

LOHALorcan O’Herlihy
Since LOHA’s inception in 1990, founder and Principal Lorcan O’Herlihy has sought opportunities to engage the operative layers of the urban landscape with respect to spatial, sensory and experimental information. In 2004 the Architectural League of New York selected Lorcan O’Herlihy as one of the eight “emerging voices” in the United States. LOHA’s commitment to design excellence in commercial, educational and residential projects has earned 26 national and international awards

OFFICE OF MOBILE DESIGNJennifer Siegal
Visiting Professor Jennifer Siegal is known for her work in creating the prefab home of the 21st century. She is founder and principal of the Los Angeles’ based firm Office of Mobile Design (OMD), which is dedicated to the design and construction of responsible, sustainable, and precision-built structures.

PREDOCK FRANEHadrian Predock & John Frane
Predock_Frane Architects was established by Hadrian Predock and John Frane in the year 2001 as a collaborative research and development design studio. The work of their practice ranges from small scale installations to large public venues. Their work has a strong material and sensate bias, with an interest in both the everyday and the exotic.

STEPHEN GLASSMAN STUDIOStephen Glassman
Stephen Glassman first caught international attention in the early 1990s when he began creating free-form bamboo installations in devastated urban sites following the aftermath of the Rodney King Riots, Malibu Fires and Northridge Quake. These works became symbols of resiliency in their LA communities and have evolved to become the permanent monumental sculptures he creates today. He represents a new generation of public artists that, in addition to a studio and gallery history, have always created work on the street — art for art’s sake in a social context.

Join M&A, in partnership with Dwell and the LA Design Festival, for our self-guided tours of LA-based architects, artists, and designers. As part of our Summer Fundraiser, the tours will give participants a rare glimpse into the creative spaces of these innovative studios, while raising funds for our upcoming programs, such as the Fall 2011 installation Sunny Side-Up by Doris Sung and Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter.

 

Choose the day/region of your liking, or come to both days for a complete Angeleno experience. Maps and wristbands will be given to participants. No one without a wristband will be admitted to the studio tours.

EDIT

10 RESPONSES TO SUMMER STUDIO TOURS

  1. MARILUZ

    JUNE 8, 2013 
    AT 9:58 PM
    EDIT

    Education must provide the opetiounitrps for self-fulfillment; it can at best provide a rich and challenging environment for the individual to explore, in his own way Noam Chomsky????? ???? ???? ?? ????????? ?????? ????; ???? ????? ????? ??? ???? ???????????? ????? ????? ??????? ??????, ????? ??? – ???? ??????

  2. NIBBY

    JUNE 9, 2013 
    AT 5:23 AM
    EDIT

    ashxatelis. Internetum haytni darnalu ev bisnes anelu hamar vochmiayn petqe imanal sayt stexcelu hmtutyunner@, ayl nayev ayn jisht matucel@, vorin menq qayl ar qayl tirapetel ev der tirapeteluenq das@ntacneri @ntacqum. Menq arajin ashkertnernenq, bayc mer kap@ erbeqel chenq korcni @nker Armani het qani vor na misht patraste patasxanel ir bolor ashakertnerin huzox harcerin. Bolorin xorhurdem talis grancvel ev masnakcel das@ntacnerin manavanq vor ayn dzez trvume anvjar, chapazanc harmaravet dzer isk tanic webinarneri mijocov ev amenakarevor@ kapvumenq mimianc ev uraxanum mer das@nkerneri araj@ntacnerov ev hajoxutyunnerov` @nker Armani glxavorutyamb. Es husovem vor ays dproc@ kunena erkar ev kanach janapar qani vor ayn uni azniv npatakner. MAXTUMEM AMENALAVN U BARIN.Dzer dproci arajin ashakertneric` Bagrat ^_^

  3. SPARKY

    JUNE 9, 2013 
    AT 5:23 AM
    EDIT

    ashxatelis. Internetum haytni darnalu ev bisnes anelu hamar vochmiayn petqe imanal sayt stexcelu hmtutyunner@, ayl nayev ayn jisht matucel@, vorin menq qayl ar qayl tirapetel ev der tirapeteluenq das@ntacneri @ntacqum. Menq arajin ashkertnernenq, bayc mer kap@ erbeqel chenq korcni @nker Armani het qani vor na misht patraste patasxanel ir bolor ashakertnerin huzox harcerin. Bolorin xorhurdem talis grancvel ev masnakcel das@ntacnerin manavanq vor ayn dzez trvume anvjar, chapazanc harmaravet dzer isk tanic webinarneri mijocov ev amenakarevor@ kapvumenq mimianc ev uraxanum mer das@nkerneri araj@ntacnerov ev hajoxutyunnerov` @nker Armani glxavorutyamb. Es husovem vor ays dproc@ kunena erkar ev kanach janapar qani vor ayn uni azniv npatakner. MAXTUMEM AMENALAVN U BARIN.Dzer dproci arajin ashakertneric` Bagrat ^_^

  4. HANNAH

    JUNE 17, 2013 
    AT 6:08 AM
    EDIT

    I wonder if the rope could have been a bit thinner so as to assist in taking on the more elegant character of the drawings (very nice by the way). Something about them seems out of scale to the frame thickness, but maybe that was the idea. Besides, the thinner the rope, the more needed to build up a sense of enclosure. I'm sure they have their reasons. I'm having trouble understanding this as a "useless object". That's a pretty lame comment. Also, it's not really fair to insist that the architects couldn't "detail a real building" based on this project. I don't see anything wrong with playing with rope, and the scope of this project didn't call for a building so your comments aren't grounded here. And one more thing, what does that fact that it was designed on the computer have to do with anything? So, if it were drawn in graphite it would have come out to be a better built work? Your connection between the success of how something "looks" when built, and how that differs from a particular form of representational media is tired and useless. Obviously, things look different in actuality than how they are drawn – hasn't that been the case for centuries? What is your point exactly?

  5. EMMY

    JUNE 20, 2013 
    AT 5:57 AM
    EDIT

    The efficiency of the panels peaks in the spring and autumn owing to the temperature effect quoted in the report – efficiency falling off with increased temperature but there is another contributory factor. Taking a value of 52.5 degrees latitude as a middle England example (apologies to the Scottish partners)then the sun’s height above the horizon would be 61deg summer solstice, 14deg winter solstice and 37.5deg spring/autumn equinox. Perpendicular incidence on the panels would occur at a panel angle with the horizontal of 90-61deg in summer (29deg), 90-14deg in winter (76deg) and 90-37.5deg (52.5deg) in spring and autumn. With the typical(?) angle to the horizontal of panels on roofs around 45deg this would mean that the angle of the incident rays would be nearer optimal in late spring and early autumn. I believe that this would also contribute to the higher efficiency at these times. What do others think?

  6. JOHANNAH

    JUNE 27, 2013 
    AT 5:57 AM
    EDIT

    Can you explain to me why it is that the people that claim they want to learn the basics always start the hard way???? Can you kindly explain that one ? ???You have a box an home – install Ubuntu on it and figure out the basics of a desktop machine. When you have actually learned something, and understand both the GUI and command line side, and file permissions, why there is no root account, and lots of other things, (Save Gentoo for your other life, after you have figured out the ins and outs of everything you want to do!)then,and only then,try setting up a mail server, or a web server – one or the other, figure that out. Tinker, putter, learn. Then,and only then,set up the other. And, a really crucial thing is that you learn how to use google to find out answers. Going to yahoo answers for such technical guidance is kind of like voting for … well I won’t go there.

  7. ALYN

    JUNE 27, 2013 
    AT 5:57 AM
    EDIT

    Can you explain to me why it is that the people that claim they want to learn the basics always start the hard way???? Can you kindly explain that one ? ???You have a box an home – install Ubuntu on it and figure out the basics of a desktop machine. When you have actually learned something, and understand both the GUI and command line side, and file permissions, why there is no root account, and lots of other things, (Save Gentoo for your other life, after you have figured out the ins and outs of everything you want to do!)then,and only then,try setting up a mail server, or a web server – one or the other, figure that out. Tinker, putter, learn. Then,and only then,set up the other. And, a really crucial thing is that you learn how to use google to find out answers. Going to yahoo answers for such technical guidance is kind of like voting for … well I won’t go there.

  8. JESSALYN

    JULY 9, 2013 
    AT 6:51 PM
    EDIT

    Good points FG. Although it’s possible the paid wifi airports are making money, I think the “win win” here is to have ad supported access which is going to reach about 100x as many people (perhaps with a pay for no ads option). In a venue like an unfamiliar airport I *like* to see advertising for local shops, restaurants, etc. In a two hour layover you have time to kill and little experience in the place, so ads arguably can direct you to things you’d probably want to consider doing anyway. Little harm in the ads also, so those who ignore them get free wifi, too.Commercially the strongest combination is probably to have free Wifi at restaurant and bar with minimum purchase. If I had a place in a paid wifi airport like BWI I’d do that and then advertise it. I would be *very happy* to arrange my travel plans to eat at the free wifi place rather than pay the airport for that service.

  9. NOOK

    JULY 9, 2013 
    AT 6:51 PM
    EDIT

    Good points FG. Although it’s possible the paid wifi airports are making money, I think the “win win” here is to have ad supported access which is going to reach about 100x as many people (perhaps with a pay for no ads option). In a venue like an unfamiliar airport I *like* to see advertising for local shops, restaurants, etc. In a two hour layover you have time to kill and little experience in the place, so ads arguably can direct you to things you’d probably want to consider doing anyway. Little harm in the ads also, so those who ignore them get free wifi, too.Commercially the strongest combination is probably to have free Wifi at restaurant and bar with minimum purchase. If I had a place in a paid wifi airport like BWI I’d do that and then advertise it. I would be *very happy* to arrange my travel plans to eat at the free wifi place rather than pay the airport for that service.

  10. ARTRELL

    JULY 9, 2013 
    AT 6:51 PM
    EDIT

    Good points FG. Although it’s possible the paid wifi airports are making money, I think the “win win” here is to have ad supported access which is going to reach about 100x as many people (perhaps with a pay for no ads option). In a venue like an unfamiliar airport I *like* to see advertising for local shops, restaurants, etc. In a two hour layover you have time to kill and little experience in the place, so ads arguably can direct you to things you’d probably want to consider doing anyway. Little harm in the ads also, so those who ignore them get free wifi, too.Commercially the strongest combination is probably to have free Wifi at restaurant and bar with minimum purchase. If I had a place in a paid wifi airport like BWI I’d do that and then advertise it. I would be *very happy* to arrange my travel plans to eat at the free wifi place rather than pay the airport for that service.

Earlier Event: June 12
WORKSHOP | Summer 2011
Later Event: August 9
WORKSHOP | S'more Crafting